Culture&Thoughts


nature-nymph:

shasana:

sancophaleague:

Recently I was in the shopping mall  and I happened to hear a conversation between some people discussing their dislike for this black girl’s hairstyle who had just previously walked by. One of them called the girl’s  hairstyle “ghetto”, then followed up by saying  “I hate when black girls put all them colors in their hair”. It led me to ask this question, what is ghetto really?  Because I have seen similar hairstyles with Caucasian women never labeled as ghetto. The word “ghetto” has a negative stigma attached to it and it seems like ghetto has become synonymous for “Black People”.What determines whether something is Ghetto or not? Why do some people consider one ghetto and not the other? Is being crafty with the supplies available to me ghetto?  Is being creative while black unacceptable? Does the price of something determine whether you should consider it ghetto or not? Or maybe I’m wrong…. Please do share your thoughts….@hated_logic

You’re exactly right. Just like when Black people improvise, it’s ghetto, but let a middle-to-upper class white person do it, it’s a lifehack, or being thrifty, or economical, or thinking out of the box, or brilliant, or whatever.

THIS FOR ALL OF ETERNITY

nature-nymph:

shasana:

sancophaleague:

Recently I was in the shopping mall  and I happened to hear a conversation between some people discussing their dislike for this black girl’s hairstyle who had just previously walked by. One of them called the girl’s  hairstyle “ghetto”, then followed up by saying  “I hate when black girls put all them colors in their hair”. It led me to ask this question, what is ghetto really?  Because I have seen similar hairstyles with Caucasian women never labeled as ghetto. The word “ghetto” has a negative stigma attached to it and it seems like ghetto has become synonymous for “Black People”.
What determines whether something is Ghetto or not? Why do some people consider one ghetto and not the other? Is being crafty with the supplies available to me ghetto?  Is being creative while black unacceptable? Does the price of something determine whether you should consider it ghetto or not? Or maybe I’m wrong…. Please do share your thoughts….

@hated_logic

You’re exactly right. Just like when Black people improvise, it’s ghetto, but let a middle-to-upper class white person do it, it’s a lifehack, or being thrifty, or economical, or thinking out of the box, or brilliant, or whatever.

THIS FOR ALL OF ETERNITY

(via younggiftedafricanqueen)

— 3 days ago with 49565 notes

wocinsolidarity:

kathereal:

buzzfeed:

This Indian actress shut down a reporter for telling her to keep quiet about women’s rights.

THE INTERNATIONAL CLAPBACK

still important!!!

(Source: BuzzFeed)

— 3 days ago with 202251 notes

hedlunds:

im tired of things costing money

(via scaryspyce)

— 4 days ago with 433312 notes
thisismylifeoffun:

kingkristamicah:

A day in your life at Spelman College in ADW.

Lifeee.

thisismylifeoffun:

kingkristamicah:

A day in your life at Spelman College in ADW.

Lifeee.

(Source: kingmawusi, via scaryspyce)

— 4 days ago with 5226 notes
headturnmeon:

mea-pulchra-don:

thesociallyawkwardpopularkids:

..but seriously! 😂😂😂 #gpa #college #gas

😂😂😂😂

Lmaoooo 😂😂😂

headturnmeon:

mea-pulchra-don:

thesociallyawkwardpopularkids:

..but seriously! 😂😂😂 #gpa #college #gas

😂😂😂😂

Lmaoooo 😂😂😂

(via awfully-distracted)

— 4 days ago with 2020 notes
ode-to-the-world:

La Mulâtresse Solitude (1772-29 November 1802), was a (en)slave rebel and heroine of the fight against slavery in Guadeloupe.
Originally a (en)slave(d) woman, she was freed by the abolition of slavery in 1794 during the French revolution. When slavery was reintroduced on Guadeloupe by Napoleon in 1802, she joined Louis Delgrès call to fight for her freedom and took part in the Battle of the 18 May 1802.
She was captured and executed by hanging after being granted to wait out her pregnancy.
Photo

ode-to-the-world:

La Mulâtresse Solitude (1772-29 November 1802), was a (en)slave rebel and heroine of the fight against slavery in Guadeloupe.

Originally a (en)slave(d) woman, she was freed by the abolition of slavery in 1794 during the French revolution. When slavery was reintroduced on Guadeloupe by Napoleon in 1802, she joined Louis Delgrès call to fight for her freedom and took part in the Battle of the 18 May 1802.

She was captured and executed by hanging after being granted to wait out her pregnancy.

Photo

(via wocinsolidarity)

— 4 days ago with 3666 notes
idanceitarotiart:

youngblackandvegan:

lucymontero:

lexkixass:

mooglemisbehaving:

gogogadgetgoatkins:

Mary Bowser, former slave of the Van Lew family, infiltrated the Confederacy by working as a servant in the household of Jefferson Davis. Bowser was assumed to be illiterate, and as a black woman was below suspicion. Practically invisible, she was able to listen to conversations between Confederate officials and read sensitive documents, gathering information that she handed over to the Union.
(From National Woman’s History Museum Facebook Page)

This needs to be a movie. Like, now.

I’d watch this movie.

How is this not a movie?

black woman excellence

CAN THIS BE A MOVIE? Even if it’s animated I’LL WATCH IT.

idanceitarotiart:

youngblackandvegan:

lucymontero:

lexkixass:

mooglemisbehaving:

gogogadgetgoatkins:

Mary Bowser, former slave of the Van Lew family, infiltrated the Confederacy by working as a servant in the household of Jefferson Davis. Bowser was assumed to be illiterate, and as a black woman was below suspicion. Practically invisible, she was able to listen to conversations between Confederate officials and read sensitive documents, gathering information that she handed over to the Union.

(From National Woman’s History Museum Facebook Page)

This needs to be a movie. Like, now.

I’d watch this movie.

How is this not a movie?

black woman excellence

CAN THIS BE A MOVIE? Even if it’s animated I’LL WATCH IT.

(via awfully-distracted)

— 4 days ago with 31563 notes